Camille France’s most precious organ post in the Madeleine.

Camille Saint-Saens was not only an idealistic composer but also a pianist, organist, writer and a teacher. Some called him the world’s greatest organist in the 19th century. His talent was first recognized at a very young age of ten when he made his concert debut starting as a musical prodigy. His compositions were mostly praised for the purity and gracefulness in his conservative musical style. Saint-Saens was born on October 9, 1835 in Paris. He was the only child of Jacques-Joseph-Victor Saint-Saens and Francoise-Clemence. After his father’s death when he was a baby, he was brought up by his mother and her aunt, Charlotte Masson who taught the basics of piano playing. Soon after, his remarkable musical talent was recognized to the point that his mother had to restricted the number of performances he gave so he couldn’t be famous too soon. This also led him to study at the Paris Conservatoire, France’s most remarkable music academy, and appointed to France’s most precious organ post in the Madeleine. In his thirties, he finally decided to stop living his lonely life and fell in love with Marie-Laure Truffot, a young sister of one of his students, and married her in 1875 and soon had two sons who died in infancy. The first child, Andre fell from a window and died while the second died from pneumonia. This caused Saint-Saens to blame his wife for Andre’s accident making the marriage to collapse and took a break from females and began to rely on his former student and friend, Gabriel Faure. Sadly in 1888 when his mother died he considered suicide and decided to live a nomadic life. He stopped being productive and began to be bitter towards people leading him to make enemies instead of friends and the negativity began to overshadow his reputation. In the last two decades of his life, everyone ditched Saint-Saens due to his “old-fashioned taste”. Camille Saint-Saens died in Algiers due to a heart attack on December 16, 1921.