First a person will receive in retirement. “According to

First let me define disability according to the Social Security Administration, it is potentially any condition that is severe enough to rule out a person’s ability to work and earn a livable income (as defined by the federal government).  The condition must interfere with the individuals daily living activities or inability to engage in work according to age if and adult.  After reading and researching information on the topic I think the regulations are strict enough.  I feel if the person meet all the qualifications that are mention in the topic of my reading there is ample enough reasoning for them to receive some form of assistance.  This is due to the fact that they will not have the total capacity to fully perform any type of physical labor and might have limited use of motor skills.  Although there is a part of the disability clause that states if a person is deemed able to do any type of work even if it is an older job they will only be allowed to receive assistance for the length of time they are considered incapacitated.  I agree with this because if you are able to do any type of work I believe you should be employed and not rely on the government to take care of your needs.www. httpssdrc.com/disabilityquestions4-5.htmlI really do not see how the cost of living will have an affect on people who retire in the future.  As a matter of fact, It seems that it will not have any bearing on the amount of payment a person will receive in retirement.  “According to the latest cost of living adjustment Social Security and Supplemental Income (SSI) benefits keep pace with inflation.”  The Social Security Act uses a formula for calculating the cost of living adjustment which are based on increases in the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W) the article states that “CPI-Ws are calculated on a monthly basis by the Bureau of Labor and Statistics.”  Therefore, the only way a person receives a lesser payment is if they choose to receive money at the age of 62 which is allowable but it will decrease the amount of payment you can receive if you continue to work until the recommended age for receiving full retirement benefits.www.ssa.gov/OACT/COLA/latestCOLA.htmlwww.ssa.gov/OACT/COLA/latestCOLA.htmlIn reference to the point of people that do not look as if they have a disability scamming the government, my response is I will not be judgmental on that issue. I know for sure that there are some people that are disabled and you can not tell just by looking at them because I have family members that if you were to just see them you would think they were fine.  However, there are some forms of disabilities that are not visible to the eye and I’m sure that these type of people have to go through the same type of steps and process to be deemed disabled as well as those that are considered to be severely disabled.  I just can not understand how someone can go into the office and pretend to be disabled and after all of the types of questions and test they are given that they can completely get by the system and receive assistance.