Over 2008 which allowed the U.S military to go

Over the past few decades South Sudan has been in conflict with Upper Nile States, and in those wars were child soldiers. This may be shocking, but child soldiers are nothing new, children as young as 12 have been handed a gun and sent into war since the Ottoman Turkish Empire. Back in those days children weren’t viewed as children, they were viewed as miniature adults. This not only affects children across the world who aren’t protected by child labor laws, but their families as well; often children’s lives are threatened if they do not agree to serve in the armed forces. In Sudan, The United Nations Children’s Fund estimated that over 15,000 children have been forced into the armed forces. This is a violation of human rights because young children are risking their lives against their will. This conflict has drawn the attention of government officials from around the world. In response to the issue, The United States President Barack Obama passed the Child Soldiers Prevention Act of 2008 which allowed the U.S military to go to Sudan and help end the child soldier issue. This response relates to interventionism on the foreign policy spectrum that I learned about in the lesson because the U.S went to help end the issue although it had nothing to do with U.S issues. ┬áIn the same year, South Sudan passed the Child Act that required a minimum age of 18 for and recruitment, whether drafter or voluntary, into the military. Any commander found using child soldiers will be held criminally responsible. The efforts of the U.S and Sudan have been successful because in October of 2016 over 140 child soldiers were released from two rebel groups in South Sudan. I would recommend that Sudan’s leaders do a sweep of the platoons going to war before war to insure no children will be in combat. Another thing that could be done to address this human rights issue is the government taking a regular census to account for every child, so if they are forced into the armed forces, the government will notice they are missing and work as fast as possible to get them out of combat and punish the commander responsible.