Seismologists pointing to the idea that the Bay Area

Seismologists are now able to study different
layers of the earth to determine when exactly each earthquake takes place. Earthquakes
widely vary in their intensity, demonstrating that while some cannot be felt at
all, others can lead to major destruction of property and civilian lives. Growing
technology has been able to establish exact dates of past eruptions, up to some
occurring one hundred years ago (Bürgman et al 1180). It has been estimated that it takes about one hundred and
forty years for the Hayward fault to accumulate enough energy for an earthquake
of magnitude above a 6.0 (Bürgman et al 1180). The last tremor along this specific fault occurred in
1868, thus pointing to the idea that the Bay Area is overdue for a major
impact. Thus, preparation for this shock is absolutely vital in order to
protect life and property (Jackson and Edgar 401), especially considering the
fact that earthquakes are among the leading causes of natural disaster deaths. Additionally,
earthquakes are not the only disaster that pose a threat to San Francisco
lives. The largest impact of an earthquake occurs from the trembling of the
ground, however, the shaking of Earth’s
crust can cause other various destruction such as collapsing buildings,
communication lines destroyed, and infrastructure cracking or collapsing. Bridge
and power lines are susceptible to damage, leading to power outages and
electrification. Movement of goods and services will not be possible. Damage to
water and gas lines, sewage lines, and other electrical lines are likely in the
presence of a major tremor. Especially considering the densely populated city
of San Francisco and narrow roads, emergency personnel will have a difficult
time navigating quickly and efficiently to areas in need of assistance. Additionally,
powerful earthquakes can easily blossom into a wide array of consecutive natural
disasters including fire outbreaks, Tsunamis, landslides, and mine blasts.